Tag Archives: fun

Youth Are Not The Future Of The Church

Seriously. They aren’t.

Last week, I (with four other adult leaders) had the opportunity to spend five days on the streets of Skid Row, working alongside and training 17 incredible young people from all across the United States. They all came to Los Angeles for the express purpose of being trained to be leaders in the YES (Youth Equipped to Serve) program, a youth service learning ministry under FOCUS North America. These young people were unbelievable.

Before they arrived on Wednesday, few of them knew one another, but by the time they left, they were clinging to one another, loving each other with a love the source of which could only be the Kingdom of Heaven. For five days straight, they cared for one another, listened to each other, embraced one another’s eccentricities, and lived in a community full of acceptance and loving confrontation. They told the truth with love, and they even showed us leaders a thing or two about what it means to be member of the Kingdom.

The group was comprised of many different personalities and quirks, but for some strange reason, they all seemed really to like one another. Friday night, one of the young men demonstrated for the group his fine ballet-dancing skills. He truly is a gifted dancer. While I was excited at the prospect of watching him dance, I must admit that there was part of me that feared how a ballet-dancing young man might be perceived. I admit that it was my human weakness that assumed these young people would ridicule him. To my delight, however, they were enthralled by his ability. After he finished his dance, he was flooded with praise, hugs, and requests for instruction on how to execute such difficult dance moves as he displayed. As I watched this, I thought, “This isn’t normal.” While any other group of young people might have mocked a young man for being a “ballerina,” these ones embraced him.

The youth also had the opportunity to lead the rest of the group in various capacities, briefing and debriefing certain aspects of a YES trip. As we gathered around these new leaders and listened to them speak, it struck me how talented, spectacular, and well-equipped these young people are for leading ministry. Of course, I was not alone in this realization; the program director and the three other adult leaders all agreed with me, even adding unanimously, “They are better at this than we are!” These young people demonstrated the love of the Kingdom and leadership skills better than any other group of people I have ever had the privilege of knowing. They were kind, loving, considerate, repentant, forgiving, and deeply passionate about the ministry opportunities that they were given. It was unbelievable.

But why was such a thing unbelievable? Doesn’t it reflect a deeper insufficiency on our part that such ministry by youth is considerably exceptional? I had to ask myself why this wasn’t normal, and I was left only with more questions.

Table fellowship or an icon of the world to come?

How often do we speak about young people as though they are the objects of our ministry? Those for whom we must do something? How often do we say things like “Young people are the future of the Church” or call them the “leaders of tomorrow?” After this weekend, I take issue with these things.

Young people are not the objects of ministry; they are ministers themselves. They are not the future of the Church; they are the Church’s present. Youth are not the leaders of tomorrow; they are the servants of today.

Our theological stances shine forth all too brilliantly when we think this way and use this kind of verbiage. By leaving young people to be the inheritors of a faith or the leaders of the Church tomorrow, we eviscerate the Gospel of its power today. We thus imply that leadership is something that is simply developed along with facial hair, social standing, or relational/vocational commitment, but when we do this, we buy into the heresy that the Church is headed by strong leaders who are somehow remarkable, rather than by people inspired by the true head of the Church: the Lord Jesus Christ.

It is true that young people need formation in order to become the leaders they are meant to be (adults need this, too). But if we look throughout the Scriptures, we see time and again that the Lord chooses the most unlikely people to be his voice and his servants.

The Lord calls the young Samuel in the middle of the night. St. Paul encourages his young disciple, Timothy, not to let anyone look down on him as a leader simply because he is young. David, a teenage shepherd who was too small for the armor of Israel, who kept the Lord’s people out of bondage to the Philistines by striking dead the giant not with swords and spears, but with the Name of God.

Young people are called to prophetic ministry within the Church. They are called to be participants in what the Lord wants from us. Yet we often treat each young person as if he or she is a tabula rasa which we must fill with our agenda, our thoughts, and our way of doing church. When we tell them they are the leaders of tomorrow, it becomes to easy for them to respond, “Great. See you tomorrow.”

Is it any wonder that they leave? Our rhetoric says that the Church needs them, but our actions and way of being with these young people says otherwise, and they are wise to it.

We need to stop thinking about how we can get young people to our events. We need to stop treating them as if we have all the answers. When we do this, we will probably be shocked to find out that when it comes to Gospel and Kingdom living, they are better at it than we are. We should focus our efforts not on instructing teenagers to dress, talk, and act like Christians, but we should instill in them the reality that they are the ministers of the Lord in this broken world. Though they aren’t clergy, they have a priesthood, and they must be invited to participate in the work of the Lord; this is true Church life. When we do this, I’m certain that we will be shocked at the results.

So, no. Young people are not the future of the Church. They aren’t the leaders of tomorrow. They are God’s chosen ministers and ambassadors today, and we need to get out of their way.

Watch out, world.
They’re taking you by storm.

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5 Reasons To Say No To Program-Driven Ministry

It is no great secret that I am duly adverse to program-driven ministry. I think I have made this abundantly clear in my post, Moving Toward Relational Ministry. While I do not think that programs are evil or will lead to the death of the Church, I do think that they are useless unless they act as platforms for young people and adults to engage one another in life-sharing relationships that are open and available to the presence of Christ within them. Programs have their place, to be sure, but I will use this post primarily to speak to some of the problems inherent in program-driven ministry.

1. Programs are impersonal. Programs by their very nature take away the human element. They are based in producing a system by which personal qualities are removed from the playing field. The idea of a program is such that any clever or well-trained individual might step in and lead the program. They do not need to have a gift or talent, and while such a gifted individual might make the program more fun, personal charisma has little to do with the success of any given program. Those for whom the program is designed are expected to show up, have the program do its work on them, and to leave edified. Programs take out the spark of spontaneity that is so natural to the rest of our human lives. Because of this impersonal element, programs demand harsh metrics of success.

2. Programs demand quantifiable success. A program is only as useful as the end-product it creates. If a public school, for example, is not successful in producing good students, then its funding from the state will be cut. If we are to hold to this standard in the Church, however, it isn’t a far stretch to look at Jesus and suggest that his “program” was a failure since Judas was a “church dropout.” Ministry, while hoping for the best, simply cannot demand such metrics of success.

3. Programs become primarily concerned with self-perpetuation. While most programs are started to help participants, they eventually become about keeping themselves alive. For example, one could look at the standardization of American education and suggest that it is a good thing. In some ways it is as it aims to raise everyone to a certain standard. Unfortunately, when reaching that standard becomes the goal, then eventually all that matters is the standard and the needs of the young people it served take a back seat to the school trying to preserve itself by teaching how to take a test. Instead of finding ways to educate each student to the best of his or her ability, we suggest that the test and the program are the key to success, even though all signs point to their failure. We can do the same thing in the Church, suggesting that a program we have come to love does not contribute to the problem of church dropout. Instead of thinking creatively how this program can be retooled, changed, or (if need be) discarded, we end up inventing new programs that do not solve the issue at hand. We simply have kept the programs alive.

4. Programs are temporary. Programs come to an end, and they thus do not echo the eternal nature of the relationship-based Trinity. Of course, we are not eternal beings apart from the Divine Life that is given to us, but the things that impact us the most resemble some part of this Divine Life. Programs may be successful at keeping young people in attendance to church or church functions, but once our young people graduate high school and these programs, they leave. This is not because our program has not done the job, but it is because it did exactly what it was supposed to; it filled a temporary gap. When we treat programs as if they are the answer, we fail to see that the Trinity is not a program; the Trinity is a community. The Trinity is relationship. Programs come to an end, and they must. If we continue to treat them like they are the answer to church dropout, then we’re in for more young people leaving the Church.

5. Programs do not teach critical thinking. “Get with the program.” It’s not too hard to imagine a well-intentioned adult saying this to a young person, but ultimately, what does it convey? “You cannot think for yourself. Trust the program. Get with it, and simply follow along like everyone else.” In our programs, we instill in our young people the virtues of going with the flow, keeping the status quo, and not thinking outside the box in order for them to belong to our program. The problem is that we are not tailoring the Christian Faith to help young people see where the Faith intersects with their lives. When they go away to college having learned the value of “getting with the program” in order to belong, then I don’t think we can be surprised when “getting with the program (or fraternity)” involves binge drinking, sleeping in on Sundays, and sleeping around.

“Getting With The Program” College-Style.
It isn’t binge-drinking if it’s a tournament. Right?

In my next post, I will explore five reasons to say, “YES!” to relational youth ministry. Be excited. Be very excited.

Image sources: http://image.stock-images-men.com/em_w/02/77/90/640-02779083w.jpg

Sunday of Orthodoxy Youth Rally!

Hello, all!

On Saturday, March 3, the Pan-Orthodox celebration of the Sunday of Orthodoxy will begin! Wahoo!

St. Stephen Serbian Orthodox Cathedral will graciously host as many young people as possible. Saturday, at 4PM, a youth rally will be held for all youth in grades 5-12. Orthodox youth will assemble from the various jurisdictions in the hope of seeing that global Orthodoxy includes all those who will enter the Lord’s house.

While the youth are rallying nearby, Bishop MICHAEL of New York and New Jersey (OCA) will be giving a talk for adults. The title of his talk is, “Our Young Adults in the Orthodox Church.”

It should be a fantastic time simply to come together with others who share the Orthodox Christian Faith and commune with them!

The Youth Rally and adult talk will be followed by all assembling for Vespers at 6:00PM, and refreshments will follow the service.

On Sunday, March 4, there will be a hierarchical Divine Liturgy at 10:00AM! Yippee!

NOTE: The Divine Liturgy will be served at St. Sophia Greek Cathedral in Los Angeles, NOT at St. Stephen.

All parishes in the Antiochian Southern California Deanery will be closed on Saturday evening so as to encourage as much attendance as possible.

I will be will there, for sure, and I certainly hope to see as many of you as possible!

Glory to Jesus Christ!

In Christ,
Christian

Here is the event flyer!!! YAY!

Winter Camp St. Nicholas: Official Video

Hello, all!

It is finally here: the official Winter Camp St. Nicholas 2012 Video!

I hope you enjoy it, and be sure to stay posted for information on summer camp. You can keep checking this blog, or you can also check out the official Camp St. Nicholas Website for more information! Registration is just around the corner, so make sure you don’t miss it!

Also. Follow the SoCalYouthMinistry YouTube Channel!

In Christ,
Christian

Winter Camp St. Nicholas 2012 Official Trailer

Hello, all!

I am working dutifully on the actual video for Winter Camp (which was 2 weeks ago…I can hardly believe it). Sorting through 4 hours of footage is certainly a difficult task, so I appreciate your patience. Maybe you don’t enjoy these videos as much as I do, and you’ve probably forgotten that I was planning to make a Winter Camp video, but I didn’t…so pretend you’re excited about what’s coming you’re way.

For now, enjoy the official trailer! Also, subscribe to the SoCalYouthMinistry YouTube Page!

In Christ,
Christian

St. Luke/St. Mark Retreat: Video

Hello, all, and Blessed Theophany!

Christ is in our midst!

On December 30, 2011, more than 60 teens from 10 parishes attended a deanery-wide retreat at St. Luke in Garden Grove. They listened to three speakers: Fr. Michael Laffoon, Fr. Michael Tassos, and myself. It was a blast of an event, and I was greatly encouraged to see the crowd that it drew.

I am hoping that we will continue to have events like this, as I believe it really brought up a lot of material for conversation and invited many into the reality of living in community of the Church.

Here is a video with some highlights from the day! Hope you enjoy it!
Subscribe to SoCalYouthMinistry’s YouTube page!

In Christ,
Christian

SOYO/GOYA Broomball Bonanza!

Hello, all!

Christ is Born!

Last Tuesday, December 27, 2011 (last year. Whoa.), a group of teens from the Greek and Antiochian archdioceses got together and joined in a cross-jurisdictional Broomball deathmatch (no death was involved). The night was loved by all, and it was definitely hilarious.

Check out the video below, and if you are interested in things like this in the future, please subscribe to this blog for updates and e-mail Christian or Cynthia so your name can be included in an e-mail list!

Christian: socalyouthministry@gmail.com
Cynthia: SoCalOrthodox@TechSourceCA.com

In Christ,
Christian

Enjoy the video!
Subscribe to the SoCalYouthMinistry YouTube Page!